Running Time:

137 min

Release Date:

August 2020

Recording Location:

Jozani Rainforest Reserve, Zanzibar, Tanzania

Zanzibar: Rainforest of the Spice Island

The island of Zanzibar lies a short distance off the coast of Tanzania. Considering the island's long history of intensive agriculture, it is surprising that any wild areas remain, but they do. Despite Jozani forest being the largest intact area of primary forest on the island, it is still relatively small, making it all the more precious as a refuge for many rare species. Iconic among them are the endangered red colobus monkeys, found only on Zanzibar.

Entering Jozani forest after dawn, our first impressions are of distant birdsong, a gentle susurration of tree crickets and a sense of peace. The tangle of trees, vines and dense vegetation affords habitat for numerous species, and as we settle into listening more intently, these become evident.

Green-backed camaropteras (our cover species) patrol the undergrowth and attract our attention by being very vocal, continually giving chapping calls and curious zipping contact sounds. Eastern nicators sing back and forth to each other with rich melodies, while greenbulls burble warmly. Two species of tinkerbird create a soft background of steady piping notes, crowned hornbills appear with piercing calls, and forest weavers, attending to their globular nests suspended in the canopy, give the most unusual combination of crystalline whistles and buzzy tones.

Then the colobus monkeys arrive, doing their rounds of the forest and crashing through the foliage overhead, occasionally giving voice with exhilarating calls and wheezy social interactions. As they move on, we note several different species of sunbird as they too move around the forest, while the rich tones of tropical boubous echo through the forest.

Concluding with a final visit from another colobus troop, this spacious recording will take you to an exotic and biodiverse island rainforest off the coast of equatorial Africa.

Andrew comments:

"On first arriving at Jozani, we employed a local guide to meet the endemic red colobus monkeys. This took us into a neighbouring plantation area, where the lower tree heights make them easier to observe as they clamber among the foliage feeding on the abundant fruits.

"From there, we explored the Jozani reserve proper. Walking into the forest along the single foot track felt like entering another world from the surrounding busy villages. Dense, dark, tangled, it seemed a little intimidating at first. But the more we sat quietly, observing butterflies, insects, land crabs and a shy elephant shrew, all while hearing the diversity of rainforest birdsong, we could appreciate how rich and precious this pocket of primary rainforest is.

"After a first morning getting the feel of the place, we decided on a second visit to make further recordings, and this soundscape is an edit of material from the two.

"This visit to Zanzibar began our Tanzanian field trip - our first experience of Africa. It felt exotic then, and listening back now, even though I've subsequently identified many of the species we heard, that sense of mystery remains."

 

Audio sample of this album

1.

The Rainforest of the Spice Island

7.46

2.

Tree Crickets

7.23

3.

White-browed Coucal and Yellow-rumped Tinkerbird

3.25

4.

Little Greenbull

4.15

5.

Colobus Monkeys Feeding in the Forest Canopy

4.27

6.

Mouse-coloured Sunbird

1.33

7.

Red Colobus Monkey

3.10

8.

Eastern Nicator

3.02

9.

Green-backed Nicator

3.02

10.

Crowned Hornbill

5.41

11.

Camaroptera Contact Calls

10.51

12.

Olive Sunbird

1.21

13.

Jozani Rainforest Chorus

6.58

14.

Camaroptera Song

5.26

15.

The Crowned Hornbill Returns

2.34

16.

Forest Weavers

6.52

17.

Green Tinkerbird

5.01

18.

Black-backed Puffback Chatter

5.41

19.

Tropical Boubou

10.56

20.

Colobus Squeals

10.36

21.

Red Colobus Calls

1.50

22.

Pale Batis

1.31

23.

Scarlet-chested Sunbird

7.00

24.

Forest Weaver Returns

5.17

25.

Tropical Boubou and Yellow-rumped Tinkerbird

6.10

26.

Colobus Social Interactions

6.07

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